Creating Value in Times of Change

Within its inner structure, Apple Inc. is a unique example of the vertically integrated four-in-one company. in particular, it presents a complex conglomerate of hardware workers, software specialists, services equipment creators, and retail representatives (Vergara, 2012, p. 78). In this context, Apple is an unusual enterprise in its sector, as it is opposed to another computer, tablet or smartphone companies that only design or make the hardware, and rely on other suppliers to supply the operating system and related applications (or apps), and to sell the product (Vergara, 2012, p. 78). In other words, the comprehensive internal structure of Apple fully satisfies all its needs connected with innovations, production, and sales. In addition, it enlarges the number of personnel. At the same time, it means the greater responsibility and obligations of corporative management. Even though Apple is not a manufacturing firm and it outsources its production to other electronic firms (Vergara, 2012, p. 78), this fact does not change the essential obligation this company has for their employees. In Urakami’s (2012) opinion, any company who places an order with a supplier must remember that this is a part of corporate responsibilities to make sure that outsourced business can be completed through the due process of business ethics (p. 3). Moreover, on its corporate site, Apple Corporation states, all over the world, we’re expanding opportunities for workers and ensuring that they are treated with respect and dignity (Apple Inc., 2015). Thus, it is evident that company managers articulate their awareness of the need to provide a comprehensive social responsibility for Apple stuff all over the world. Nevertheless, the style of vertical integration this company currently applies enables its concentration solely on their core competencies (Vergara, 2012, p. 79).