The Dewey Decimal System is no longer relevant to today’s youth as there are easier and more functional ways to catalog in elementary libraries that would seem to enhance circulation

That said, there are drawbacks to the more intuitive processes – as shown by bookstores who do not use the Dewey Decimal System, and use a system that is more akin to tagging, books may sometimes be difficult to find, and users in a bookstore often need assistance to find where books are grouped. The Dewey Decimal System also has the advantage in that it provides users with an address for the books, and books may be better microcategorized in a Dewey system than in a bookstore system. That said, he Dewey Decimal System is no longer relevant to today’s youth as there are easier and more functional ways to catalog in elementary libraries that would seem to enhance circulation.
The Dewey Decimal System, according to Wiegand (1998), is a system of classification that is used by libraries across the country. It is based upon a system by which knowledge is organized in well-defined categories, with well-defined hierarchies, a rich network of relationships, and meaningful notation (Mitchell, 2001). The DDS is divided into ten main classes, which include computers, philosophy, religion, social science, language, science, technology, arts and recreation, literature, and history and geography. This is the first digit, which is the broad classification scheme. The second digit of the books in the Dewey Decimal scheme is the narrower classification – for instance, while the 500s are reserved for science, the second digit indicates what kind of science – 510 for math, 520 for astronomy, etc. The third digit is narrower still, and indicates the section. While 510 is for mathematics in general, the third digit indicates different disciplines within mathematics – such as 512 is reserved from algebra, and 513 is reserved for arithmetic, etc. (Bean, 2001).
While this is a classification scheme that has been used for at least the last 150 years